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2 edition of Development of a low frequency ambient noise storm model for the Arctic Ocean found in the catalog.

Development of a low frequency ambient noise storm model for the Arctic Ocean

by David A. Collins

  • 197 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Naval Postgraduate School, Available from National Technical Information Service in Monterey, Calif, Springfield, Va .
Written in English


About the Edition

The development of an ambient noise model for use in ice-covered Arctic waters is the primary goal of this research. The generation of ambient noise is considered to originate from large scale deformation of the ice cover (pressure ridge formation) which is caused on a synoptic scale by convergence of the ice cover due to wind stress/speed associated with the passage of Arctic storms. The Arctic Storm Noise Model (ASNM) has been developed as a dynamic model to predict the occurrence of extreme noise events. The emphasis is on accurately predicting the large increases or decreases in ambient noise, which observations have shown to be in the order of 20 to 30 dB over a matter of hours. ASNM was adapted from the Ambient Noise Directional Estimation System (ANDES) for use under the Arctic pack ice. ASNM predictions are compared quantitatively to noise measurements made by ice-mounted drifting buoys in the Arctic basin during the early 1990"s. Results showed that for extreme events (<5th or >95th percentile) ASNM is accurate in predicting both the level of ambient noise and the large increases in the noise record. Due to the encouraging results further improvements are recommended to increase the robustness of the model for potential tactical use by submarine units operating under the Arctic pack ice.

Edition Notes

StatementDavid A. Collins
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 136 p. ;
Number of Pages136
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25265177M

1. Determine the major sources (or drivers) of variation in low frequency ambient sound levels on a regional and ocean basin scale. A. What are the regional source contributions to low frequency ambient sound levels? B. Is there variation in source characteristics of the major low frequency source components over space and time? C. low frequency noise is a non-linear e˙ect (Longuet-Higgins, Figure 4. Ambient noise levels measured at the CTBTO hydroacous-tic monitoring stations for ˛e reported levels are superimposed on the “Limits of Prevailing Noise” curves published by Wenz (). Figure 5. Comparison of ambient noise levels over time, based on.

Underwater Ambient Noise 25 There is a dichotomy between deep waterand shallow water ambient noise, based largely on the nature of sound propagation from sources located near the sea surface. Deep water ambient noise is from an environment for which there is no bottom interaction of sound from distant sources (typ-ically commercial shipping). Ambient noise in the Arctic Ocean measured with a drifting vertical line array.

Ambient Noise in the Ocean Hildebrand , following Wenz Ambient Noise at High Frequency. 2/7/ 2/7/ Shipping Lanes from HITS Model (Courtesy of Richard Heitmeyer - NRL) Airgun Noise in Arctic Alaska HARP. From Roth et al. Airgun Noise in Arctic. 2/7/ Low frequency noise arrives from the horizontal, as frequency increases, the vertical and near vertical contributions increase more rapidly than horizontal contributions. So vertical directionality is the key attribute of ambient noise to identify its source. In shallow water ambient noise and its vertical directionality are studied.


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Development of a low frequency ambient noise storm model for the Arctic Ocean by David A. Collins Download PDF EPUB FB2

The ambient noise in the Arctic is highly variable, exhibiting some of the quietest as well as the noisiest ocean noise conditions of all the world’s oceans.

A composite of various measurements of Arctic ambient noise is shown in Figure Figure 6, Knudsen Sea State Zero refers to the ambient noise level in the temperate oceans at sea state zero (the quietest conditions) for comparison.

The Arctic Storm Noise Model (ASNM) has been developed as a dynamic model to predict the occurrence of extreme noise events. The emphasis is on accurately predicting the large increases or decreases in ambient noise, which observations have shown Author: David A. Collins. Bjørnø, in Applied Underwater Acoustics, Introduction.

The unique feature of the Arctic and Antarctic polar oceans that affects underwater acoustics, both the propagation of sound and the ambient noise, is the presence of sea ice that seasonally expands and retreats and ice shelves extending from the land into the also have important differences.

Low-frequency noise is usually much higher level than high-frequency noise due because of the character of the noise sources themselves and also as a result of the frequency dependence of sound absorption in the ocean, as described below.

Typically, the property of the noise that is modeled is its pressure spectral density level. Abstract. Low frequency ocean ambient noise data are reviewed and summarized. The experimental data, both omnidirectional and directional, when not dominated by shipping noise, are shown to suggest wind dependent noise at the low frequencies (Cited by:   Ocean Noise Variability and Noise Budgets Ocean Noise Variability.

Sound levels in the ocean are not constant, but differ from location to location and change with time. Different sources of sound contribute to the overall noise level, including shipping, breaking waves, marine life, and other anthropogenic and natural sounds.

At low frequencies (20– Hz), the background sound level is. Finally, this book provides a series of appendices giving in-depth mathematical treatments. With its complete and careful discussions of both theory and experimental results, this book will be of the greatest interest to graduate students and active researchers working in fields related to ambient noise in the ocean.

Specifically, a growing body of literature suggests that low-frequency, ambient noise levels in the open ocean increased approximately dB per decade during the period – Here we show that this increase can be attributed primarily to commercial shipping activity, which in turn, can be linked to global economic growth.

Relaxing sound video of a oil rig in the antarctic ocean. These white noise ambient sounds are generated by water, wind and snow falling and If.

Western Arctic ambient noise near the Beaufort Sea12,17–19 has been studied more extensively than the eastern Arctic ambient noise (defined here as areas east of 60 W).

Studies north of 85 N are extremely rare.1 In Aprila bottom-moored vertical hydrophone array was deployed at Ice Camp Barneo near 89 N, 62 W.

Abstract. I review mechanisms for the generation of Arctic Ocean noise. These are connected with ice fracture processes that radiate sound into the water, and pertain to the high concentration of ice as in the central Arctic, as well as to the low concentration often found near the.

Low Frequency Attenuation in the Arctic Ocean. Pages Low Frequency Noise Fields and Signal Characteristics. Pages Carey, W. (et al.) Preview Buy Chap95 € Time Dependence of Infrasonic Ambient Seafloor Noise on a Continental Shelf.

Pages Akal, T. (et al.) Preview Buy Chap levels. Anthropogenic activities in the ocean have increased over the past 50 years, re-sulting in more low-frequency (frequency (1–20 kHz) noise.

Sources of anthropogenic noise include commercial shipping, defense-related activ-ities, hydrocarbon exploration and development, research, and recreation. JOHN HILDEBRAND Impacts of. Mid to High-Frequency Ambient Noise Anisotropy and Notch -Filling Mechanisms speed profile cause near horizontal ambient noise to be very low.

This noise notch may be filled by the isotropic component of the ambient noise. Aredov [5], for example, from equations based on a different noise model.

We will investigate the spatio-temporal variability in low-frequency deep ocean ambient sound levels (10 - 2, Hz) at these 12 ocean regions within the U.S. EEZ. Our ongoing goal is to maintain (and possibly expand) the array and build a multi-year record of ambient sound levels in these regions.

Mechanisms and measurements of ambient noise in the deep Arctic Ocean will be reviewed and discussed. While emphasis will be placed on low frequencies (5 to 50 Hz), the review will consider the relationship to noise at higher frequencies.

Also the contrast between shore fast/shallow water noise and deep water noise will be drawn. [Supported by. Signal transmission in ocean using water as a channel is a challenging process due to attenuation, spreading, reverberation, absorption, and so forth, apart from the contribution of acoustic signals due to ambient noises.

Ambient noises in sea are of two types: manmade (shipping, aircraft over the sea, motor on boat, etc.) and natural (rain, wind, seismic, etc.), apart from marine mammals and.

from measurements of ambient noise. Knowing the seabed properties is important to predict sound propagation in the ocean (and therefore predicting sonar system performance).

These methods will lead to new surveying techniques that can be used to update the Low Frequency Bottom Loss (LFBL) or High Frequency Bottom Loss (HFBL) databases.

ABSTRACT: Ocean ambient noise results from both anthropogenic and natural sources. Different noise sources are dominant in each of 3 frequency bands: low (10 to Hz), medium ( Hz to 25 kHz) and high (>25 kHz).

The low-frequency band is dominated by anthropogenic sources: pri-marily, commercial shipping and, secondarily, seismic exploration. The purpose of this research is to study the characteristics of the low and mid frequency ocean ambient noise field with the long term goal of exploiting the noise field for physics based processing methods that improve sonar system performance.

OBJECTIVES. Ocean ambient noise. spatial origin of the ambient noise components used in this study. In the low-frequency band used here (1–40Hz)—with most of the energy of the coherent arrivals being centered around 10Hz—ambient noise propagating along the SOFAR channel is known to mainly .2 Underwater ambient noise 8 What is ambient noise 8 Noise generation processes 10 3 Sources of ambient noise 12 Wind-sea noise 12 Precipitation noise 13 Shore/surf noise 13 Beach profile and beach face sediment 14 Noise sources in the surf zone 14 Sound propagation from the surf zone Low frequency output of a hydrophone showing tidal changes caused by a combination of pressure and temperature changes.

World War II low frequency ambient noise measurements, made at various U.S. and U.K. locations, in various band widths.